Sep 232014
 

Virtually all membership in Rotary is based upon a “classification.” Basically a classification describes the distinct and recognized business or professional service that the Rotarian renders to society. The principle of Rotary classification is somewhat more specific and precise. In determining the classification of a Rotarian it is necessary to look at the “principal or recognized business or professional activity of the firm, company or institution” with which an active member is connected or “that which covers his principal and recognized business or professional activity.” It should be clearly understood that classifications are determined by activities or services to society rather than by the position held by a particular individual. In other words, if a person is the president of a bank, he or she is not classified as “bank president” but under the classification “banking.”

The classification principle also permits businesses and industries to be separated into distinct functions such as manufacturing, distributing, retailing and servicing. Classifications may also be specified as distinct and independent divisions of a large corporation or university within the club’s territory, such as a school of business or a school of engineering. The classification principle is a necessary concept in assuring that each Rotary club represents a cross section of the business and professional service of the community. Members are permitted admission if they are retired, and who had never been in Rotary but would have been qualified. These individuals can be admitted as past service members and are the only Rotarians without a current or former classification.

Limitations. This club shall not elect a person to active membership from a classification if it will not result in the classification making up more than 10 percent of the club’s active membership.

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